Dr. James Chandler, N.D.,  Ph.D - Chandler Naturopathic Health Center
About Naturopathic Doctors
 
A little naturopathic history.
 
Naturopathic Doctors have been around for hundreds of years but more recently the naturopathic profession started in the late 1800s and early 1900s.  There has been a ongoing dispute within the fields of naturopathy since the 1930s.  During the early and mid 1900s, the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) launched a campaign to discredit naturopathy and any doctor who practiced it.  Today, naturopathy has seen a tremendous come back because of the allopathic medical short comings as it applies to wellness and health care.  Even today, organizations such as the AMA, FDA, and the medical branch of naturopathy are trying to discredit, regulate, and license naturopathic doctors, specifically Traditional Naturopathic Doctors.
 
What is the training of a Naturopathic Doctor?
 
Naturopathic doctors (both medical and traditional) must have at least a four year bachelor's degree prior to entering a school for naturopathy.  Traditional naturopaths study the human body, biology, anatomy, physiology, and human development just like medical naturopaths except, traditional naturopaths do not use human cadavers in their course of study.  The main philosophical  reason cadavers are not used, true naturopaths do not use invasive methods in promoting health and wellness. Both Traditional  and Medical Naturopaths are eligible for certification through private professional organizations. 
 
"Licensed" Naturopathic doctors on the other hand, complete only two years of training in the same basic sciences that are studied at allopathic medical schools using cadavers.  With this training, they think they are entitled and privileged  to practice medicine as a primary care provider  just like a medical doctor (medical doctors go through four years of medical school and four years of residency training in order to practice medicine). True naturopathy does not allow for this practice because, it is allopathic type medicine and it is invasive.  This type of naturopathic practice goes against the very core of naturopathy and is a very dangerous practice.  More people are harmed by "Licensed" naturopaths than any other natural modality.  On the Internet they claim to be trained just like medical doctors with additional training in natural medicine. This is one of the greatest myths of the 21th century and very confusing to the public.  Contrary to their belief, these naturopaths are not qualified to diagnose, prescribe, do surgery, or practice medicine as they would have you think.
 
licensure verses Certification
 
     It is a myth that being licensed guarantees quality or safety of service.  The act of being licensed is a political and governmental concept.  A license is a permission (from a government body) to do something that is otherwise forbidden.   For the most part, a license is required or mandatory for engaging in that activity.   Governments issue licenses (a license is a privilege).  A license presumes that the activity is a privilege and not a right. The purpose of licensing is to restrict entry and therefore, control the  profession. 
     Certification, on the other hand,  is a declaration that a course of study has been completed, examination passed, or a specified criteria for certification has been met.  Certification is not a permission to act, but rather a statement of completion or qualification.  Certification is issued by a private organization. It is not a state privilege and does not involve the police power  or political influences of the state.  Certification is based on the premise that there is a right to work. Certification only provides the consumer with more information about a practitioner. It also gives practitioners a way to increase their competency through a course of study and exams, and to advertise or inform others of their completion of this course of study.  The main purpose of certification is to set standards, educate practitioners and inform the public.  
 
For more information on Licensing, certification, and registration of naturopaths please visit, www.anma.org.
 
     The state of North Carolina is one of 35 states that does not license naturopathic medicine at the present time.  The "Licensed" naturopaths and the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP) are actively trying to change North Carolina's laws in order to license naturopaths through their mis-representation and mis-guided beliefs of both traditional naturopathy and of their own qualifications.  Every year, legislation is introduced in the North Carolina Legislature which restricts natural medicine practices to those that have attended one of the west coast "naturopathic colleges".  Each year, so far, the American Naturopathic Medical Association (ANMA) and the Coalition for Natural Health have been instrumental in defeating this type of legislation.  Should licensing of naturopaths in North Carolina pass, the citizens of this state will have their "right to choose" severely limited.  I urge everyone interested in maintaining the integrity of natural medicine to donate to the ANMA at www.anma.org and contact their state representative to voice their opposition to such restrictive legislation.
 
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